Orchids Collections

"Orchids Teach us Patience" - Author Unknown

The orchid collection at the Arboretum has waxed and waned over the years, and while it lacks in numbers, it packs a punch in diversity and flowering. With as many as 15 genera in the late 1990s, the orchids represent both cool-and warm-loving plants. Many growth habitats are represented, from upward growing Phalaenopsis to outward growers like Cattleya. Many in the collection are epiphytes, which grow on the trunks or branches of trees, not in the soil. Patience is required from the orchid grower. Some of the orchids have flowers lasting for months, while others only last for a few days. 

This winter we have a large collection of orchids in the Greenhouse at the Barlett Arboretum and Garden. They are being carefully attended to by our Master Gardeners!  

For tips and tricks, we recommend visiting the American Orchid Society website to learn orchid care information. They even have a seasonal orchid care checklist. Learn about the November/December to-do list.

Join us on December 16th for the American Orchid Society Northeast Judging Center Orchid Auction. Plants from the private collections of AOS judges will be auctioned off. Learn More

Credit: Information regarding the orchid collection at the Bartlett was from the book "Bartlett Arboretum & Gardens" by S. Jane von Trapp. Published by Arcadia Publishing, Charleston, South Carolina. Books are available to purchase at the Bartlett Arboretum & Gardens.

Bee Bee Tree

Bee Bee Tree

Tetradium daniellii, bee bee treeRutaceae. You are likely to hear this tree before you even see it. The nectar of this tree's small white flowers is known to attract all kinds of pollinators, particularly honey bees. Also known for its dark green, glossy leaves, it is quite a sight to behold.

Butterfly Weed

Butterfly Weed

Asclepias tuberosa, butterfly weed, Apocynaceae. This bright beauty will attract all types of pollinators to your garden. It is most known for being a Monarch Butterfly's favorite plant, as it is the only leaf their caterpillars can eat. Keep an eye our for their colorful blooms, and the colorful visitors they bring. 

Cardinal Flower

Cardinal Flower

Lobelia cardinalis, Cardinal flower, Campanulaceae. From the moment it begins to bloom in mid to late July this bright red flower beckons Ruby-throated Hummingbirds and Swallowtail Butterflies. Clearly visible among the dark green foliage of high summer, the many tubular flowers on a strong upright stem charm human visitors to the garden as well.

Japanese Stewartia

Japanese Stewartia

Stewartia pseudocamellia, Japanese Stewartia, Theaceae. This beautiful tree stands tall and proud. Its bark camouflages with grays and browns, while its flowers show off a bright white with an orange center as they speckle through the dark green foliage. It is a true marvel to look at, and one you should surely come to see.